Arts & Culture

 

Innovative art by and for people with disabilities

Jim Charlton

Arts & Culture Project Coordinator

jcharlton@accessliving.org

(312) 640-2122

Access Living’s Arts & Culture Project promotes innovative art, supports new and established artists with disabilities, develops new audiences, and increases public access to disability arts and culture.

Arts & Culture Events at Access Living

Access Living hosts a series arts and culture events throughout the year with the support of community partners and disabled artists. Events include:

  • Lectures
  • Poetry readings
  • Musical and dance performances
  • Discussions
  • Hands-on workshops in writing, dance, performing, and more

Take a look at our calendar for details on our latest arts & culture events. 

Two people in wheelchairs, facing each other and dancing.
Movement workshops like this one is just one example of the many arts & culture events we have at Access Living.

Access Living’s Permanent Art Collection

A photograph of a painting by disabled artist Katie Dallam.
In “My Master” fear and alienation are made visible. Artist Katie Dallam paints a figure constructed of multicolored snakes twining together to form the shape of a woman’s body. 

Access Living has a permanent art collection featuring work that captures aspects of the disability experience. Displayed on the walls of our building, the majority of the collection showcases pieces created by artists with disabilities from all over the country.

For example, the painting pictured on the right is from disabled artist Katie Dallam.

Dallam’s experience is considered to be the source for F.X. O’Toole’s short story “Million Dollar Baby,” which inspired the movie of the same name that was directed by Clint Eastwood. In it, the real-life circumstances were changed to create a tragedy rather than the true tale of artistic and personal accomplishment.

Dallam did not die—or attempt suicide—as a result of her injury. Instead, she worked to re-establish her art career, which was derailed after her traumatic brain injury, slowly regaining her skills after spending six months in a coma and emerging incapacitated. Her work is a ferocious contemplation of her changed sense of self.

Schedule a tour of Access Living to view our entire art collection.