Join Today, or Sign-In if you're already a member.

Chun-Shan (Sandie) Yi

Chun-Shan (Sandie) Yi
Members of Sandie Yi’s family have been born with variable numbers of fingers and toes for generations (i.e. many more or less than five digits per limb). These objects elaborate and ornament Yi’s hands and feet, based on the striking forms and intriguing variation of her limbs.
Gloves (Orange)
Photograph, 24” x 36”
2005
Access Living Art Collection
Gift of Mrs. Beatrice Mayer
Baby Onesie Series
Cotton and pigment, 24” x 24”
2006
Access Living Art Collection
Gift of Mrs. Beatrice Mayer

Baby Onesie Series
Cotton and pigment, 24” x 24”
2006
Access Living Art Collection
Gift of Mrs. Beatrice Mayer
BIO
Chun-Shan (Sandie) Yi was born and raised in Taiwan. She received a BFA, and MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She resides in Taiwan, working as an art therapist and helping establish disability culture in China.

Members of Sandie Yi’s family have been born with variable numbers of fingers and toes for generations (i.e. many more or less than five digits per limb). Due to stigma around disability, Yi’s family refused to discuss her difference, and insisted that she forget any future of love or success.

Yi came to Chicago for school, where she encountered disability culture. It changed her life; she began to explore her unique morphology through art, and to use art therapy to help others - especially children - realize this transformation.

Yi says: “I grew up with being labeled as ‘disabled,’ and would often hide my hands when I was younger. Now I don't see my body is disabled/impaired at all. My hands and feet are my assets, my special traits. Art is a way for me to understand the beauty of the challenges in my life, and also as a way to adorn myself. I wish to be identified as ‘born with two fingers and two toes on each limb.’"

THE ART
These objects elaborate and ornament Yi’s hands and feet, based on the striking forms and intriguing variation of her limbs. One set of gloves is crocheted to elongate the shape of her hands; in the other, she has reconstructed a pair of bright orange readymade gloves to fit her shape. In these works, her hands and feet themselves act as unusual decorations in relationship to the body as a whole.