Hollis Sigler

Hollis Sigler
Hollis Sigler
Sigler was diagnosed with breast cancer in 1985. For the last 15 years of her life, she looked unflinchingly at her experience while placing it within the context of the larger, political sphere of American women’s lives. Her work and advocacy had a significant impact on the struggle to give breast cancer a visible public presence.
Queen Of Love, Hollis Sigler - Embedded
Queen of Love
Pastel on Paper, 18” x 24”
2000
BIO
Hollis Sigler (b. 1949, Gary, Indiana; d. 2001, Chicago, IL) received a BFA from Moore College of Art in 1970 and an MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 1973. Her awards included those from the Illinois Arts Council and the National Endowment for the Arts. She had solo exhibitions at the National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington, D.C., Susan Cummins Gallery in Mill Valley, CA, and Printworks Gallery, Dart Gallery, and Carl Hammer Gallery in Chicago. Other important exhibits included those at the Whitney Biennial, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Corcoran Gallery in D.C., the Museum of Modern Art in NY, the Contemporary Art Museum in Cincinnati, and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago. Her work is held by these and many other museums and private collections. Sigler was a professor of art at Columbia College.

Sigler was diagnosed with breast cancer in 1985. For the last 15 years of her life, she looked unflinchingly at her experience while placing it within the context of the larger, political sphere of American women’s lives. Her work and advocacy had a significant impact on the struggle to give breast cancer a visible public presence. The joy and rigor of her vision provides a window into a long-hidden and difficult world.

THE ART
For most of her battle with the disease, Sigler was able to continue doing what she loved: gardening, painting, and playing with her dogs. For the last years of her life, when the cancer metastasized to her bones, she began to use a wheelchair or cane. It is thought that this is the only image where Sigler portrayed her wheelchair in a work of art. Completed in 2000, eight months prior to her death, “The Queen of Love” shows a goddess flying above her wheelchair. The queen unfolds into an endless sky as a butterfly from a chrysalis.