Susan Dupor

Susan Dupor
Susan Dupor
Communication and its mysteries run through much of Dupor’s work. Women slip through woods, float in lakes, or transform into animals. Their hands form words in ASL that echo the shapes of nature.
Revival of the Deer, Susan Dupor - Embedded
Revival of the Deer
Oil on Canvas, 30” x 40”
2003
BIO
Susan Dupor’s work has been included in numerous exhibitions, including the national touring exhibition “Elements of a Culture: Visions by Deaf Artists.” She was awarded the 2004 Wisconsin Arts Board Fellowship, and her works were displayed at the James Watrous Gallery at the Overture Center for the Arts in Madison, Wisconsin. Her most recent solo shows were at the Dyer Arts Center at Rochester, New York, and the Marian Gallery in Milwaukee. Dupor (b. 1969, Wisconsin Rapids, WI) earned her BFA at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

She says: “My figurative and narrative oil paintings are inspired by my experience as a deaf woman. Deaf friends and I pose as models using sign language hand shapes with connections to the environment. Like our environment, sign language is meant to be preserved and respected.”

THE ART
Communication and its mysteries run through much of Dupor’s work. Women slip through woods, float in lakes, or transform into animals. Their hands form words in ASL that echo the shapes of nature. These interwoven communications cause the earth to speak in passionate and cryptic ways. Humans and animals try to make themselves known in simultaneous translation.

In “Revival of the Deer” a woman crouches in a winter wood, amid bare brown trees that mimic the form of antlers—and hands. She holds a deer’s skull in her right hand, while with her left she makes the sign for “deer,” touching her hand to her forehead; the word itself makes an antler-like form. She bridges the gap between them, “reviving the deer” in the moment of mimicry—and communion.