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Gordon Sasaki

Gordon Sasaki
“Glenn” and “Zazel” are from “NY Portraits,” images of 50 New York City artists with disabilities. Sasaki presents them as individuals, each committed to their practice while dealing with the personal and societal challenges of having a disability.
Zazel
C-Print Photograph, 36” x 24”
2006
Glenn
C-Print Photograph, 36” x 24”
2006
BIO
As an artist and educator in universities, museums, schools, and private institutions, New York City-based Gordon Sasaki is a dedicated proponent of inclusion through the arts. His work is exhibited internationally and held in many private and corporate collections. He teaches in the community and access programs of the education department at the Museum of Modern Art in NYC, which aim to bring art experiences to the disabled and underserved. Born in Honolulu, he has been a wheelchair user since a 1982 automobile accident.

THE ART
“Glenn” and “Zazel” are from “NY Portraits,” images of 50 New York City artists with disabilities. Sasaki presents them as individuals, each committed to their practice while dealing with the personal and societal challenges of having a disability. The series examines the constructed nature of beauty through the filter and diversity of disability. Included are a diverse array of artists, including visual and performance artists, dancers, actors, musicians, filmmakers, and writers. These works are shot from the low angle of Sasaki’s wheelchair, giving them a literally important viewpoint.

At first glance, Glenn resembles a movie monster with his stiff arms and dark-shadowed eyes, as he stands in the center of Saint John the Divine. Looking closer, we see that his expression is not menacing but blissful, as if he is singing a hymn or hearing the music fade from the cathedral’s organ. Glenn is a painter who describes his work as having “gothic” qualities. Zazel is an actress, dancer, and model. She is photographed while rehearsing in the studio, leaning backward to face us with a direct but upside-down stare. The colors around her are blazing orange tones, making her resemble a living fire.

There is no current available artist’s website. Sasaki can be contacted through MOMA.